What I Learned From My First Year in an MFA Program

Last fall, about six months into the pandemic, I moved from the Northeast to a small town beneath the Mason-Dixon line so that I could study writing. Specifically, I came to study poetry. It’d been my dream to get an MFA since I took my first creative writing class in college and found joy and … Continue reading What I Learned From My First Year in an MFA Program

The Simplicity of Solitude Is a Hard Thing to Perfect: An Interview With Sam Beebe

Part 1: Master of Hybrid I reached out to Sam Beebe of the music Project Black Bear on a Thursday afternoon. I spent the morning cleaning up a mysterious amount of dead milipedes in my apartment. It was here, like many times before, that the line “the simplicity of solitude is a hard thing to … Continue reading The Simplicity of Solitude Is a Hard Thing to Perfect: An Interview With Sam Beebe

Summer 2021: Publication Opportunities for Writers

by Blessing Christopher As the spring semester winds down, most literary magazines run by MFA programs are currently closed for submissions. However, other markets are accepting stories in the summer. Here are some places to send your work. The Missouri Review Founded in 1978, The Missouri Review accepts fiction, nonfiction and poetry submissions all year … Continue reading Summer 2021: Publication Opportunities for Writers

Interview with an Editor: Lauran Jones, Undergraduate Publisher Dedicated to Lifting Black Voices

by Alexa Garvoille Lauran Jones is a Creative Writing Major at UNC-Wilmington, graduating with a BFA and Certificate in Publishing in May 2022. She is a creative writer, graphic designer, and the founding editor-in-chief of UNCW’s Black literary journal, Seabreeze: A Literary Diaspora. She is also the layout designer for UNCW’s Atlantis: A Creative Magazine. … Continue reading Interview with an Editor: Lauran Jones, Undergraduate Publisher Dedicated to Lifting Black Voices

Flash Creative Nonfiction: Capturing a Moment in Time

by Blessing Christopher It feels like everything went to sleep last year after COVID-19 struck. Thankfully, there are indications that the world will heave a collective sigh of relief in the near future. If you’re one of the writers who found it hard to write in the thick of the lockdown, here’s hoping that the … Continue reading Flash Creative Nonfiction: Capturing a Moment in Time

Why You Should Read John Murillo’s “Kontemporary Amerikan Poetry”

By Honora Ankong As Black people, our existences are a thing of poetry. We are poems and we do poems long before we have the “language” for it. Poetry is everywhere always— it is ancestral and rooted deep in our bones. John Murillo’s 2020 poetry collection “Kontemporary Amerikan Poetry” is a testament to the Black … Continue reading Why You Should Read John Murillo’s “Kontemporary Amerikan Poetry”

TMR Readers Spotlight Series: Alexa Garvoille

What’s your most controversial belief about literature? I have an extremely personal relationship with reading. Illustration 1: when I was sixteen I would write in the margins of books which friends certain characters reminded me of (including when I read Crime and Punishment, and yes, one of my friends reminded me of an ax-murderer). Illustration … Continue reading TMR Readers Spotlight Series: Alexa Garvoille

TMR Readers Spotlight Series: “A Peek at my Interiority”

by Honora Ankong What’s your astrological sign?   Pisces (sun) + Virgo (moon) + Capricorn (rising)  In these pandemic days when we’re all sheltering-in-place, what does your home feel like?  Most days in my tiny Blacksburg apartment waft with the scent of incense/ candles/ palo santo. Every corner of every room is filled with either Miss … Continue reading TMR Readers Spotlight Series: “A Peek at my Interiority”

Mourning and Reimagining through Queer Young-Adult Fiction

by Bessie Flores Zaldívar I grew up in Tegucigalpa, Honduras-- queer, girl-bodied, with two languages throbbing on my tongue. Like many writers, I developed an early love for stories and, subsequently, reading. Knowing two languages from an early age meant more stories. More words, more worlds. But both of my languages-- English and Spanish-- are … Continue reading Mourning and Reimagining through Queer Young-Adult Fiction

Methods for Concentration

By Annie Raab Sometimes it seems that writers possess a uniquely short attention span. Between generating words, researching esoteric topics to render believable stories, and attempting to maintain at least partially in reality, the battle for attention is a competitive field. Luckily, humans have been struggling to concentrate on tasks long before the internet, and … Continue reading Methods for Concentration

Writing off the Page: A Sampling of Contemporary Women and Non-Binary Writers with Interdisciplinary Practices

As a young writer, I aimed to bring my artistic and poetic practices into conversation with one another, but I searched for role models without many leads. Aimless Google searches would come up mostly dry. Poetry installation? Poetry sculptures? Hyperlink poetry? When I asked my early creative writing professors about poets working off the page, … Continue reading Writing off the Page: A Sampling of Contemporary Women and Non-Binary Writers with Interdisciplinary Practices