Avoiding Amazon: Where We’re Buying Books

There's a lot of Terrible going on right now, but books make things better! Lately it feels increasingly vital to show our support for small businesses, especially minority-owned ones. Not sure where to go for your book-ish needs, other than Amazon? Never fear! Members of your friendly neighborhood tmr staff have curated a list of … Continue reading Avoiding Amazon: Where We’re Buying Books

A Wild Circus in the Back Room: An Interview with KMA Sullivan of Vinyl and YesYes Books

This interview was conducted over email during the Fall of 2018. I don't know if the right word to use is 'stumble' when YesYes Books has been publishing for close to a decade, but I stumbled across their booth at an AWP conference two years ago and have been an avid reader of their publications … Continue reading A Wild Circus in the Back Room: An Interview with KMA Sullivan of Vinyl and YesYes Books

A Braided History of Socialism, Literacy, and Education

Since the beginning, the minnesota review has supported and published progressive essays, criticism, and creative literature in an ongoing effort to provide “lively and sophisticated signposts to navigating current critical discourse” (via Duke University Press). Also published in the minnesota review are interviews with contemporary intellectuals and radical thinkers, who contribute context and a higher … Continue reading A Braided History of Socialism, Literacy, and Education

Applying to Grad School? A Quick (Real) Guide to Applying to MFAs

Application season is a dreadful, exhausting season for many MFA-seeking writers. It's true when they say ('they' being current MFA students, past applicants, and program faculty) applying to MFA programs is not for the faint-hearted. For one, it takes forever. Researching and deciding on your top schools is not a simple task. Most programs require … Continue reading Applying to Grad School? A Quick (Real) Guide to Applying to MFAs

Poem Review: “When I Kiss You, A Casket Opens” by beyza ozer

  “When I Kiss You, A Casket Opens” begins its first line in the middle of a response that has no discernible ending— “this is not terrorism/this is toxic masculinity”— it is a reaction, a refusal, a riot against the mass media that twists its angles for the right endorsement and against the culture that twists … Continue reading Poem Review: “When I Kiss You, A Casket Opens” by beyza ozer

One Reader’s Not-Quite-Manifesto on Poetry Selection for the Lit Magazine

Magazines have outlines for the kinds of work they want – format, delivery, length, and maybe a few general dos and don’ts (no genre pieces, no previously published, no rhyming, please do rhyme, etc.). Beyond that, the only indication anyone usually writers is to “read our previous issues” – which, while not bad practice, doesn’t … Continue reading One Reader’s Not-Quite-Manifesto on Poetry Selection for the Lit Magazine

Contributor Update: Valerie Bandura

Valerie Bandura's poem "Step Right Up" was first published in Issue 78 (Fall 2012) of the minnesota review. Since then, Bandura has just released a new book of poetry, Freak Show (Black Lawrence Press/Dzanc Books, 2013). Bandura's poems have also appeared in numerous journals, including Ploughshares,  Alaska Quarterly Review, Cimarron Review, Mid-American Review, The Asheville Poetry … Continue reading Contributor Update: Valerie Bandura

The Best Books We Read in 2013: Poetry Roundup

  TMR's poetry readers share the best books we've read in the last year. Arian's pick: Rough Day, Ed Skoog (Copper Canyon, 2013) Ed Skoog’s newest collection of poems, Rough Day, navigates the potential of language to make us into the world and negotiates the spaces that we are ultimately born into. These poems reconcile the … Continue reading The Best Books We Read in 2013: Poetry Roundup

Crying, Singing, Speaking: On How Meter Leaks Into Our Lives

Not many of my friends who write poetry do so with a conscious, traditional application of rhyme and meter. I'm not complaining—I'm not a formalist, don't think that these features are vital to poetry, and recognize that as we write, we constantly produce new forms (whether or not we refer to them that way). Creating … Continue reading Crying, Singing, Speaking: On How Meter Leaks Into Our Lives

“The cat & I are so sad and God I wish you’d call”

About a month ago, someone sent me an email that contained a link to Portia Elan's poem, "A Simile Is a Suspension Bridge," featured in Ninth Letter's Web #1 issue from this past winter. The email was empty except for the link . Nothing else was needed.I read the poem in my office and cried. I … Continue reading “The cat & I are so sad and God I wish you’d call”

[Contributor Update]: Jesse Damiani

In honor of the new academic year, we're re-visiting Jesse Damiani's "First Grade," which appeared in issue 78 of the minnesota review. Damiani is currently an MFA candidate in poetry at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His poetry has been published or forthcoming in 42opus, elimae, Pleiades, and Ninth Letter, among others. He is a past … Continue reading [Contributor Update]: Jesse Damiani

Interview with Karin Miller, Editor of The Cancer Poetry Project Anthology

As I’m writing this introduction, I’m also waiting to hear the results of my niece Malia’s one-year scans. They will tell us whether or not the stage IV neuroblastoma that she spent half of her life fighting has stayed away from her neural crest cells. Since Malia was declared NED (No Evidence of Disease) last … Continue reading Interview with Karin Miller, Editor of The Cancer Poetry Project Anthology

Recently Read This and Loved it all the Way – Carrie Nelson

George Ella Lyon is a celebrated southern writer whose work includes everything from children’s books to memoirs to plays.  She is, however, first and foremost, a poet which means her job is to “see and sing the connection between things.”  Her collection Catalpa won her the Appalachian Book of the Year Award, and last year … Continue reading Recently Read This and Loved it all the Way – Carrie Nelson