[From the Archives] Engaging Advocacy: Academic Freedom and Student Learning

Charlotte A. Kunkel and Sheila Radford-Hill's "Engaging Advocacy: Academic Freedom and Student Learning" first appeared in issue 76 (Summer 2011) of the minnesota review. Kunkel is a sociologist who is passionate about teaching.  Her work and teaching center around social justice issues, particularly anti-racism and the intersectionality of race, class and gender.  Most recently her … Continue reading [From the Archives] Engaging Advocacy: Academic Freedom and Student Learning

[From the Archives] A Memoir of Feminism: An Interview with Nancy K. Miller

"A Memoir of Feminism: An Interview with Nancy K. Miller," excerpted below, was first published in Issue 68 (Spring 2007) of the minnesota review. The interview took place on 10 February 2007 in Nancy K. Miller’s office at CUNY. It was conducted by Jeffrey J. Williams, then editor of the minnesota review, and transcribed by … Continue reading [From the Archives] A Memoir of Feminism: An Interview with Nancy K. Miller

[From the Archives] Where the Wild Things Aren’t: Animals in New York City

"Where the Wild Things Aren't: Animals in New York City" by Mark B. Feldman first appeared in issue 73-74 (2009) of the minnesota review as part of our Feral Issue. You can read the full essay via our online archive, available through Duke University Press. On top of the cantilevered entrance to Marcel Breuer’s Whitney … Continue reading [From the Archives] Where the Wild Things Aren’t: Animals in New York City

[From the Archives] The Wiggle Room of Theory: An Interview with Samuel Delany

"The Wiggle Room of Theory: An Interview with Samuel Delany," excerpted below, first appeared in issue 65-66 (2006) of the minnesota review. This interview was conducted in writing between September 19 and October 4, 2005 by Josh Lukin, a Lecturer in English at Temple University. You can read the full interview via our online archive, … Continue reading [From the Archives] The Wiggle Room of Theory: An Interview with Samuel Delany

[From the Archives]: Roberto Esposito and Jean-Luc Nancy’s “Dialogue on the Philosophy to Come”

Roberto Esposito and Jean-Luc Nancy's "Dialogue on the Philosophy to Come" first appeared in Issue 75 (Fall 2010) of the minnesota review. You can read the full article online through Duke University Press, available here. [The following dialogue began as a result of prefaces Nancy and Esposito wrote for each other’s works: Nancy’s preface to … Continue reading [From the Archives]: Roberto Esposito and Jean-Luc Nancy’s “Dialogue on the Philosophy to Come”

[From the Archives]: How to Win Your Argument in Higher Ed Without Spending One Red Cent

In light of the recent elections and debate over education, we revisit Mary Soliday's "How to Win Your Argument in Higher Ed Without Spending One Red Cent," which first appeared in Issue 63/64 (Spring 2005) of the minnesota review. Soliday taught at the City College of New York, City University of New York for 17 … Continue reading [From the Archives]: How to Win Your Argument in Higher Ed Without Spending One Red Cent

[From the Archives]: An Interview with Donna Haraway

Today's post is an excerpt of an interview with Donna Haraway, from Issue 73/74 (Fall 2009-Spring 2010). This interview took place at Donna Haraway’s house in Santa Cruz, CA, on 6 July 2009. It was conducted by Williams, then editor of the minnesota review, and transcribed by Heather Steffen, then the managing editor of the … Continue reading [From the Archives]: An Interview with Donna Haraway

[From the Archives]: An Interview with David Bartholomae

Today's post is an excerpt of an interview with David Bartholomae, from Issue 69 (Fall 2007). This interview took place in Jeffrey J. Williams’ office at Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, on 8 August 2007. It was conducted by Williams, then editor of the minnesota review, and transcribed by David Cerniglia, then the assistant to the … Continue reading [From the Archives]: An Interview with David Bartholomae

[From the Archives]: An Interview with M.H. Abrams

Today's post is an excerpt of an interview with M.H. Abrams, from Issue 69 (Fall 2007).  The interview took place on 26 August 2007 at M. H. Abrams’ home in Ithaca, NY. It was conducted by Jeffrey J. Williams, then editor of the minnesota review, and transcribed by David Cerniglia, then assistant to the review while … Continue reading [From the Archives]: An Interview with M.H. Abrams

[From the Archives]: Why Everyone Should Study Linguistics

Robin J. Sowards' "Why Everyone Should Study Linguistics" first appeared in issue 68 (Spring 2007) of the minnesota review. Sowards teaches English at Duquesne University. His research interests include British poetry of the Long 19th century, literary theory, German Idealism, linguistics, and Noam Chomsky. All literary critics already do some kind of linguistics. When we … Continue reading [From the Archives]: Why Everyone Should Study Linguistics

[From the Archives]: “Flesh and Body in the Deconstruction of Christianity”

Roberto Esposito's "Flesh and Body in the Deconstruction of Christianity" first appeared in issue 75 (2010) of the minnesota review, in a special section on Franco-Italian Political Theory. Esposito teaches Theoretic Philosophy at the Italian Institute for the Human Sciences in Naples and Florence. His recent works, translated into various foreign languages, include Bios: Biopolitics … Continue reading [From the Archives]: “Flesh and Body in the Deconstruction of Christianity”

[From the Archives]: “Thinking Outside the Quad”

Paul Youngquist's Provocation piece first appeared in the minnesota review in 2008 (Issue 70).Youngquist teaches English at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he writes on science fiction, British Romanticism, and other illusions. He is the author of Monstrosities: Bodies and British Romanticism (U of Minnesota P, 2003) and Madness and Blake’s Myth (Penn State … Continue reading [From the Archives]: “Thinking Outside the Quad”

[From the Archives] What is an Intellectual Woman?: An Interview with Toril Moi

Today's post is an excerpt of an interview with Toril Moi, from Issue 67 (Fall 2006).  The interview took place on 1 September 2006 in Toril Moi’s office at Duke University. It was conducted by Jeffrey J. Williams, then editor of the minnesota review, and transcribed by Heather Steffen, then the assistant to the journal … Continue reading [From the Archives] What is an Intellectual Woman?: An Interview with Toril Moi

[From the Archives] Class Matters: An Interview with Adolph Reed, Jr.

Today's post is an excerpt of an interview with Adolph Reed, Jr., from Issue 65/66 (Spring 2006).  The interview took place on 26 August 2005 in Adolph Reed’s office at the University of Pennsylvania. It was conducted by Jeffrey J. Williams, the editor of the minnesota review at the time, and transcribed by Nilak Datta, then … Continue reading [From the Archives] Class Matters: An Interview with Adolph Reed, Jr.

[From the Archives] Redescriptions of Female Masochism

Rita Felski's "Redescriptions of Female Masochism" first appeared in issue 63-64 (Spring/Summer 2005) of the minnesota review. Of the terms bequeathed to us by the fathers of sexology, masochism is one of the most perplexing. Masochism has been depicted as craven submission or as wilful revolt, as a form of radical self-shattering or the epitome … Continue reading [From the Archives] Redescriptions of Female Masochism

[From the Archives] This I Believed

Michael Bérubé's "This I Believed" first appeared in Issue 71-72 (Spring/Summer 2009) of the minnesota review. Sixteen years ago, in the summer and fall of 1993 when I was writing Public Access, I described myself as “a lefty middle-innings pitcher, keenly aware of living in a time when New Deal liberalism marks the leftward border of the … Continue reading [From the Archives] This I Believed

[From the Archives] The Obligations of Academic Freedom

Timothy Burke's "The Obligations of Academic Freedom" first appeared in Issue 67 of the minnesota review. Many academics, including myself, rise to defend “academic freedom” in response to claims that professoriate is too “liberal.” The concept of “academic freedom,” however, seems to mean many things to many people, and there is often a lack of appreciation about why it … Continue reading [From the Archives] The Obligations of Academic Freedom

[From the Archives] Meat Consumption and Food Traceability

Dennis Soron's "Meat Consumption and Food Traceability" first appeared in our combined Issue 73-74. Since the publication of the essay in 2010, interest in the origins of food has only increased: controversies over pink slime in our hamburgers and cochineal dye in popular beverages have dominated news cycles in recent weeks.  In this essay, Soron … Continue reading [From the Archives] Meat Consumption and Food Traceability