Avoiding Amazon: Where We’re Buying Books

There's a lot of Terrible going on right now, but books make things better! Lately it feels increasingly vital to show our support for small businesses, especially minority-owned ones. Not sure where to go for your book-ish needs, other than Amazon? Never fear! Members of your friendly neighborhood tmr staff have curated a list of … Continue reading Avoiding Amazon: Where We’re Buying Books

What We’re Reading

The Artist's Way by Julia Cameron: This classic self-help recovery for creatives book has given me back my sealegs after beginning the MFA. Fighting imposter syndrome, feeling creatively blocked, wondering whether or not poetry is a worthwhile pursuit? This book's week by week readings and activities get me out of my head. Right now I'm … Continue reading What We’re Reading

Five Tricks to Succeed and Survive the Writing Ultra-Marathon (10-16hrs)

  We tend to idealize the writing marathon. Such a delicious, romantic image of writing all day, so into your craft you forget to eat etc. But suppose you do get that one day to make up for all the others you missed, how do you make the marathon (6+ hour chunks of writing time) … Continue reading Five Tricks to Succeed and Survive the Writing Ultra-Marathon (10-16hrs)

Applying to Grad School? A Quick (Real) Guide to Applying to MFAs

Application season is a dreadful, exhausting season for many MFA-seeking writers. It's true when they say ('they' being current MFA students, past applicants, and program faculty) applying to MFA programs is not for the faint-hearted. For one, it takes forever. Researching and deciding on your top schools is not a simple task. Most programs require … Continue reading Applying to Grad School? A Quick (Real) Guide to Applying to MFAs

A Complete, Totally Definitive Guide to Short Story Craft

1. Start the story with an intriguing first line, something that propels the reader forward, captures their attention, makes them feel compelled to read on. Do not start with something boring or commonplace. This is the worst thing you can do. This will make the reader throw your story into a trash compactor and compact … Continue reading A Complete, Totally Definitive Guide to Short Story Craft

Making Those Last Words Count

Hopefully you already read this wonderful piece on first lines in fiction. Those sentences are important because, of course, they color a reader’s perception of the rest of the story. Daniel discusses a “solicitation of trust”—“a chance for the author to communicate that the reader is in capable hands.” And he’s right: I’ve put down … Continue reading Making Those Last Words Count

Things You Will Learn From Spending A Day With Percival Everett

You will learn that Percival Everett’s favorite word is No. You will learn that the gizmo used to castrate a horse is called – somewhat appropriately – an emasculator. You will learn the importance of reading forklift manuals. You will learn that Percival Everett doesn’t believe in the ‘craft’ of writing. You will learn about … Continue reading Things You Will Learn From Spending A Day With Percival Everett

Contributor Update: Sam J. Miller

Sam J. Miller's "Operation Skunk," excerpted below, first appeared in Issue 70 (2008) of the minnesota review. Since its publication, Miller has also released Horror After 9/11 (2011), a critical anthology co-edited with Aviva Briefel, along with pieces in The Rumpus, Slice Magazine, Arts and Letters, Strange Horizons, and Electric Velocipede. Miller also has work … Continue reading Contributor Update: Sam J. Miller

The Best Books We Read in 2013: Fiction Roundup

TMR's fiction readers have a few recommendations up our sleeves—here are the best books we read in the last year. Amy L.'s pick: The Accursed, Joyce Carol Oates (Ecco, 2013) I've been hyping Susan Steinberg's Spectacle a lot this year, but as much as I love that collection, I can't earnestly call it my "favorite." In sort of … Continue reading The Best Books We Read in 2013: Fiction Roundup

If You’re Stuck, Wait It Out – Advice from an Editor

As writers, we have what would appear to be a very easy job: float through life, and wait for the muse. Forget the crafting, forget the editing – the worst part of writing is just starting.Usually my writing process follows a very similar trajectory: wait for weeks, think about needing to write something, wait another … Continue reading If You’re Stuck, Wait It Out – Advice from an Editor